Category Archives: Bankruptcy

financial insolvency and bankruptcy laws

Bank Workouts

While negotiating debt workouts with banks in the last few months, I’ve noticed a number of clients coming into my office with a significant financial problem: the bank has a lien on all of their assets, and they don’t have the cash flow to ensure that everyone gets paid, including the landlord, the bank, and other general creditors.

In these situations an old saying by Donald Trump seems appropriate: “When you owe the bank 1 million bucks and can’t pay it, you have a problem. When you own the bank 10 million bucks and you can’t pay it, the bank has a problem.” In other words, when cash flow is tight, the entrepreneur needs everyone involved to work with him.

Of course, if everyone can work together, the hard-working entrepreneur can pull his way out of a slump. However, sometimes in such a situation despair can set in, and the entrepreneur becomes filled with apathy, losing his drive. The obvious solution is to give the debtor a little breathing room, so that he can get back to focusing on what’s most important to resolving their financial issues: cash flow.

In a number of recent situations, my first approach was to sit with the bank, once learning they had collateral and all the assets of the business. This may seem like a precarious or risky position, but actually it is to the small businessman’s benefit. When the bank has the first claim on all the assets, there is nothing to fear from general creditors, who have no claim on assets due to the fact the debt is unsecured. As you can see, keeping the bank happy is critical.

But just because the bank is happy doesn’t mean the debtor’s problems are over. The debtor must continue to work hard, and work steadily. Creditors need to be alerted to the fact that bankruptcy is possible, if workout discussions are not productive for all parties. The debtor’s attorney will need to handle all lawsuits, and everyone involved needs to be given enough information to understand exactly what’s going on.

Are you worried about these kinds of issues? Call me on my small-business hotline, to discuss these matters, or schedule a consultation in the office by calling (317) 266-8888. We will try our best to get to the bottom of your issues, and help you to solve them quickly with minimal aggravation.

Credit Reports (Part 1)

Years ago, it occurred to me that we all need to know something about credit, and how credit reports are made.  I put together a CD for clients explaining credit reports.  Now with advances in the web, I can get it to you without a CD! I hope this 12 part series is of use to you. Immediately thereafter, I will publish my 11 part series on credit report correction.

Here is the first audio clip.  Hope you can find the time to listen to the whole series.  There is a lot of good information in these old CDs from several years ago, still relevant today.

Download This Episode

Planning the use of money (Part 6)

By now, if you have reviewed the five videos in previous blog posts, you should have a fair idea of where your money is going, and where it needs to go. Now comes the hard part: actually making the necessary decisions.  Some expenses will definitely have to be modified.

Remember: every dollar saved is a dollar earned.  Indeed, the dollar saved is an “after tax” dollar, all of which you get to keep.  The dollar earned is a “before tax” dollar, and you will only get to keep 70 cents of it, at most.  So we can see that keeping expenses down definitely helps in money terms.

In personal terms, the stress that comes from unpaid bills is removed.  Family life is easier, and there is time for exercise and good diet.  Medical bills are less in the long term.  Although this is not true in every case, a simple budget can often help to organize and reduce stress in many other areas of life.

So make your life easier with a budget!  If you want the sample file I used to create these videos in MS Excel, just email me at
mike@mikenorrislaw.com
and I will be happy to send it with a reply.

I suggest you download the video file below, as viewing is easier due to a bigger screen size.  Or you can just click on the icon and the video will play immediately.  As always, please call if you have questions.

 

Download This Episode

PlayPlay

Can inaccurate credit reports be corrected?

Yes, they can.  The Fair Credit Reporting Act, as amended by the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act (FACTA), allows the consumer to question accuracy of reports, and furnish proofs to be considered in making corrections.  Several years ago, I taught a seminar just after a change in the law.  You can examine those seminar materials here:  Fair Credit Reporting and mortgage reporting, bky issues .  If you want to read the law yourself, you can access it here:  FCRA as amended by FACTA

In essence, those rules provide that you have the right to one free report each year, and you can apply for that report from each of the three credit reporting agencies (CRAs): Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion.  If you would like the form to use, you will find it here:  Annual Credit Report Request Form .  If you are turned down for a loan, you can get the credit report which was used to evaluate your credit, and it is also at no cost.

In order to dispute inaccurate (including incomplete) credit entries, you must contact the CRA with information showing the inaccuracy, and they have 30 days to investigate.  Hopefully, they will make the correction with no further effort on your part.

Review my attached writing to consider all the myriad ways a credit report can get inaccurate.  Frankly, it is amazing we have accurate reports.  A number of years ago, it was estimated that 40% of the reports have errors which will lead to denial of credit, and 80% of reports have errors in general.  With that in mind, looking at your report once a year is a good idea.

One common area of inaccuracy is the listing of debt discharged in  bankruptcy.  Often, the report is not updated after bankruptcy.  Even though debt is washed out in bankruptcy, the credit report is silent as to that issue, giving the impression that the debt is still owed!  Thus, it is always wise to review the credit report 6 months after a bankruptcy discharge.  If you continue to pay on debt after a bankruptcy, the creditor must continue to report your payments after bankruptcy, in order for the report to be accurate.