Category Archives: Bankruptcy

financial insolvency and bankruptcy laws

Are collectors obliged to be polite?

From time to time, we get questions about the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, and so I have posted it to this blog entry.  In essence, this federal law protects the consumer from harsh and abusive collection practices, allowing him/her to discuss debt issues without being threatened, harassed or humiliated.

This brief outline is hoped to be, for most consumers, a sufficient summary of the most relevant points.  Please bear in mind that I have not covered all of the law in its context; I am merely suggesting answers and statutory references for the questions I am most frequently asked in my practice.  For your reference, I have placed a highlighted copy of the statute here: Fair Debt Collection Practices Act

The first thing to remember is that only the debt collector is regulated.  The full time employee of a creditor does not have to pay attention to this set of restrictions.  See Section 803(6).

Collectors must call during normal hours, 8am to 9pm.  In addition, they may not call a consumer when they know he is represented by an attorney, or at the consumer’s place of business when such calls are prohibited.  See Section 805(a).

Further, all communication must cease if the consumer writes the collector, unless the communication is to notify the consumer of an impending lawsuit.  See Section 805(c).  These measures allow common sense structure to the phone contact with the consumer.  This is, in my opinion, good for everyone.

Certain obviously deceptive practices are forbidden, such as threats of violence, profanity, repeated calls to harass, and the failure to identify oneself.  See Section 806.

In addition, false and misleading representations are banned. Among those commonly  used statements are: exaggerating the amount or status of a debt, misrepresenting oneself as an attorney, threatening arrest, threatening a false credit report, or any other “deceptive means of collection”.  All of these misstatements are violations of the law.  See Section 807.

The collector cannot collect more than is owed, per Section 808.  The same section also puts some restrictions on postdated checks.  Read that section to become more acquainted with your rights.

Damages under the statute at Section 813 are realistically limited to $1,000 per occurrence plus attorney fees.  And the collector who can prove an innocent mistake will be absolved of fault, with no damages awarded to the consumer.  Nevertheless, this federal statute places significant limits on the abusive collector, who now must “mind his manners”.

Does this automatically curb all collection abuses?  Of course not.  But a polite reminder that you are aware of the statute will often lead to a more civil conversation.  A more polite conversation is often a more productive one.  Ultimately, this is often the best way to save time and money for all parties concerned.

Does Debt Settlement really work?

Lately, I have done a fair amount of lecturing to CPAs and others about debt settlement, illustrating the techniques used for handling debt with this bankruptcy alternative.  For a description of the relative advantages in comparison t0 Chapter 13 bankruptcy, I have composed a summary:Chapter 13 compared to Debt Settlement.

Of course, some will worry about tax issues in debt settlement, as well they should.  The good news is that an insolvent debtor can escape taxation on debt forgiveness, using the IRS insolvency rules.  Want to calculate if you qualify?  Use the Insolvency Worksheet.

If you are a professional who wants the best information, I would suggest IRS Pub 4681 , which details the rules in depth.  Also, the IRS website on this topic is useful:  Debt Forgiveness IRS websites .  In any event, those loaded up with consumer debt should consider debt settlement as a useful alternative to Chapter 13 bankruptcy, or other debt workout alternatives.

A radio show…….why bother?

Most Saturday mornings, I start the day with a warm cup of coffee while I read the newspaper, or maybe several different newspapers, if I haven’t yet caught up with the news of the week.  After immersing myself in reading for a while, I take some time to peruse the articles that I’ve arranged on the kitchen table in front of me.

As the “theme of the week” becomes clearer, I’m typically lost in thought while I organize the main “themes” and my presentation.  And before you know it I’ve got the topic for my weekly radio show.

Once done, I critique it. Was it compelling?  Lucid?  Relevant?

Why bother?  Just for the thrill of thinking out solutions to everyday problems in a world where people need someone to trust.  In the practice of law, communication is everything.  Let us start with building trust, based on reliable and solid advice.